An Infinite Variety of Styles

I started looking though the Sky Landscape Artist of the Year 2018 timelapse videos – there are many – and it’s interesting to see the many different approaches to making a painting; from very loose and unstructured to the insanely realistic. There is no one way, of course, but one of my favourites out of the lot I saw was this one by Haidee Jo Summers. You can see paintings being made with the aid of iPads too but I have to say, I’m not a big fan of that method. The deadline for application for this year’s show is May 11 and you can do that here.

Whatever you do, watch as many of these short videos as you can ; they’re an education. 

HAIDEE JO SUMMERS: Time lapse – Sky Arts Landscape Artist of the Year 2018 from N9 Design on Vimeo.

The Story of the Blues

A carving in high quality lapis lazuli. Photographed by Adrian Pingstone

I’ve always wondered about the history of certain paints and ultramarine has one of the most romantic. Take a read of the following article on the Winsor & Newton web site:

“The word ‘Ultramarine’ comes from the Latin ‘ultra’ meaning ‘beyond’ and ‘mare’ meaning ‘sea’, as this was how Lapis Lazuli first arrived in Europe. Ultramarine came in the form of lumps of the semi-precious stone Lapis Lazuli (the ‘blue stone’ in Latin), via foot and donkey on the Silk Road from Afghani…” read more on the W&N web site

Vermeer and Lenses

We’ve often spoken about the old masters’ use of lenses during class and one of my students has found a link to this lecture in University College London which is well worth watching. Now I have to go off and find the film, ‘Tim’s Vermeer’ which is mentioned by Professor Steadman. Enjoy.